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Dødheimsgard – A Umbra Omega

What is on display prominently throughout A Umbra Omega is impressive layering of moods, ranging from ferocious and brooding to those of sonically clean.

As a band tantamount to eschew from the conventional methods of psychedelic black metal, Norwegian’s Dødheimsgard (DHG) have unveiled their latest muse of art into their beautifully-woven tapestry of evolution. Notwithstanding the eight-year gap between their electronic-enhanced Supervillain Outcast, as the significant delay has allowed DHG’s cult-like followers to prepare for the frighteningly dense and equally mesmerising journey that is known as A Umbra Omega.

Bearing in mind that at face value, DHG have the presence of any average black metal band influenced by dark, ruminating themes and as such creating the ominous mood to envelope this; the point remains that if you play each album of theirs anonymously to someone who has never heard them before, chances are they will believe wholeheartedly that about 10 different bands are on what could possibly be the wide-ranging playlist of the century.

A Umbra Omega comprises five ambient and organic tracks, each providing their own twists and turns that are perhaps more twisty and turny than a twisty-turny thing. A Umbra Omega is not simply an album that features five songs that start at one point and finish at another; it is a hallucinogenic voyage into the unknown, a beautiful escapade into nothingness, and a sense of falling below the surface all in one virtual excursion. Very few black metal bands can captivate the listener into doing this to such an extent, and there is more to DHG than simply proclaiming love for Satan at every dispensable opportunity.

It’s no secret that DHG are prime executioners of the post-Floyd progressive approach, and it’s important to remember that thousands of bands have attempted this before, and many more will continue to do so. There is more to the surface than the textured ambience, slow and yet equally menacing bass lines and string-work that Roger Waters could permeate for hours on end, yet DHG find a way to weave this creativity together with precision and care. Rhythmic tremolo picking sections circa Emperor make consistent appearances, yet it doesn’t feel haphazardly added for the sake of being added. The same cannot be said for many others of this genre.

What is on display prominently throughout A Umbra Omega is impressive layering of moods, ranging from ferocious and brooding to those of sonically clean. Chances are you will hear a new riff or piece each time you listen to it. The production of the album is exactly as it should be; gritty and murky that perfectly complements the vicious clamour that the album brings at times. Meanwhile, from a vocal standpoint, we begin to see the forming of a dedicated, accurate attempt at the DHG microphone helm, which is nigh-on perfect for the task at hand. Tonally excellent.

DHG have created something quite extraordinary here with A Umbra Omega that really has to be heard to be thoroughly appreciated. My words can’t really describe it accurately enough. Chances are that regular Dødheimsgard followers will be sufficiently spoiled, whilst newcomers could very well be blown away. Go grab it now!

dodheimsgard - a umbra omega

Track listing:
The Love Divine
Aphelion Void
God Protocol Axiom
The Unlocking
Architect Of Darkness
Blue Moon Duel

Dødheimsgard are:
Thunberg – Guitar
Vicotnik – Guitar
Aldrahn – Vocals
L E. Maloy – Bass
Sekaran – Drums

Dødheimsgard band 2015

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About Dan Walton (172 Articles)
Dan (or Danuel as many know him) is the newest member of the editorial team of MetalRecusants, after being a contributing writer for a few years. He spends his days sending emails, editing, drinking coffee or listening to some form of Australian metal. He can usually be spotted wearing his Northlane windbreaker around the mean streets of Shoreditch. Find him on Twitter: @DanuelKC - he tweets about sports a lot.

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