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VICTORIAN WHORE DOGS: “We Take Our Music Seriously But We Don’t Take Ourselves Seriously.”

"If you treat a battle of the bands like a competition and not just as a gig with great networking opportunities then it's going to impact on the scene."

Victorian Whore Dogs are an extremely hard working band. They have toured relentlessly across the country which has given them support slots with Conan and Burden of the Noose and a victory in the Metal to the Masses competition, which granted them the chance to play Bloodstock. The band’s hilarious frontman Danny Page talks about their origins, touring, Bloodstock Festival, comedy in music, the popularity of sludge metal, and a lot more in a chat with one of the most delightfully named bands in the UK.

Danny Page - Victorian Whore Dogs

Jack: How are you doing?

Danny Page (Vocals): Moist, eager, and ready.

Jack: Before we talk about the tour and album I want to know a bit about your origins. How did you guys form?

Danny: We all collected together under a silver moon and exchanged figs.

Jack: Did you always form with the intention of being a sludge band?

Danny: We formed with the intention to write music we like and enjoy. Sludge and post-hardcore happened to be the thing we collectively drew too, as well as some grindcore, post rock, and other elements. We try to be diverse.

Victorian Whore Dogs 1

Jack: Why do you think stoner/sludge and doom has suddenly gotten more popular?

Danny: Trends ebb and flow I suppose. We were way into Iron Monkey and bands like that when people fucking hated them. It’s tragic Jonny [Morrow] isn’t alive to see the impact his band had.

Jack: Your name is a reference to Brass Eye, what do you love about the work of Chris Morris?

Danny: His work has inspired us greatly, musically and really in general. To take depraved, morbid, and disgusting subjects and imagery, then make them amusing and zany is an art he has perfected.

Jack: Is it important for bands to have a sense of humour?

Danny: I think it’s important bands be themselves. Everyone has anger and hardships, and bands that chose to be serious and convey a serious message is great if that’s who they are. But we aren’t that, we have bizarre subject matters and take our music seriously but we don’t take ourselves seriously. On stage we are ourselves, and that just happens to be strange and funny.

Victorian Whore Dogs Tour

Jack: You just finished two tours of the UK. How did they go?

Danny: Incredibly well, was really nice to play new areas with Morass of Molasses, Greenhorn and Tides of Sulfur. Was also great to meet other bands from the areas and fans too.

Jack: You did two tours with a break in between, did any tour go better than the other?

Danny: They were both equally successful, we couldn’t be happier.

Jack: Did any particular show stand out?

Danny: The show at the Black Heart with Tides of Sulfur, Greenhorn, Morass of Molasses and Sea Bastard was a real highlight. We organised it ourselves and it was great that so many people came and ever band played a great show.

Sea Bastard - Black Heart

Jack: On this tour you played some areas for the first time, do you research new territory and the scene before playing it?

Danny: In a sense yes, we try to work with promoters who know the style and the type of crowd, but realistically we’ll play to anyone.

Jack: Did you share a van with any of the bands or did you travel alone?

Danny: Oh no no no. We traveled alone, we have many eccentricities that must be kept to the four of us.

Jack: What do you get up to in the van, do you play games at all or just listen to music?

Danny: I drive, as it is required. Adam sleeps, Steve torments me with mashed potatoes, and Andy plays on his tablet. There’s usually music on in the background too.

Jack: You’ve been touring in support of your latest release Afternoonified. Are you happy with the response?

Danny: Yeah we’re really happy with all the feedback we’ve been getting, be it positive or otherwise. The fact people are listening to it is a compliment enough.

Victorian Whore Dogs Afternoonified

Jack: What was the recording process like?

Danny: Really DIY. I recorded, mixed and mastered it all myself with great advice from some friends who are producers. We recorded it all at our rehearsal space.

Jack: The album has been reviewed in Greece, is it weird knowing your music is being listened to outside the UK?

Danny: It’s more flattering than weird.

Jack: Do you plan to play abroad soon?

Danny: Hopefully we have plans in the pipeline next year.

Jack: Speaking of shows you won the Metal to the Masses and got the chance to play Bloodstock festival on the New Blood Stage, how did that go?

Danny: It was an incredible experience for us. We were treated so nicely by the crew and had an incredible show. It was amazing being in the VIP area and mingling with the big boys.

Victorian Whore Dogs - Bloodstock

Jack: The Metal to the Masses has been criticised as dividing the scene and putting bands into competition with each other instead of working together. Do you agree?

Danny: I don’t think M2TM has ever wanted to divide the scenes, if anything I’d say some bands are more guilty of it. If you treat a battle of the bands like a competition and not just as a gig with great networking opportunities then it’s going to impact on the scene.

Jack: With the cancellation of Hevy Festival, do you think Festivals are under threat?

Danny: I would say they’re evolving as opposed to under threat. The festival culture will never die, but we may see the shift from big festivals to smaller ones, as the bigger bands stop and the newcomers take bigger stages. The scenes are really diverse now, we’ll never see another band as big as Metallica, but there will always be support and fans.

Jack: Finally, what are your plans for the rest of the year?

Danny: Play more, write more, eating pudding, and fight limescale.

Jack: Thank you very much for your time.

Danny: I love your face.

Victorian Whore Dogs 2

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Jack
About Jack (818 Articles)
I am a recent graduate from the University of Essex in Colchester where by the luck of Odin I met the editor, Dom. I first got into metal when I was 13 and now I am 22 and own an uncountable amount of band T-shirts. I also regularly attend gigs (local and in neighbouring areas) as well as festivals. My musical taste is varied; I like nu metal (my first love), thrash, black, death, doom, folk, sludge (my favourite genre), symphonic and many more of the multiple genres that metal has to offer, I even like some metalcore (I know it's a dirty word within some metal circles but some of it is outstanding). One of my most memorable metal moments was meeting Grand Magus at the Bloodstock signing tent and having the whole tent to myself, spending a few minutes talking to them.

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