LATEST

DEADWOUND: “Life Is Too Short for Bullshit and Fucking Around”

"I think we hope more than anything that people can see that it's written with heart, time and thought behind it.

Deadwound are a band moving forward, it’s clear from attending one of their shows and listening to their music that they are on the move. Having just released their excellent EP Identity Shapes, I chatted to guitarist Phil Mann to find out about the band’s origins, the making of the EP, fitting the band round day jobs and playing Hang the Bastard’s final London show.

Identity Shapes by Deadwound

Jack: Hey, thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. How are you doing?

Phil Man (Guitar): Thank you! Very well, thanks.

Jack: How did you all meet?

Phil: Me and Gavin have known each other for a while, mainly from playing shows in and around London in our other bands (Silent Front/Bast). Everyone apart from me used to play in bands together. When I started tattooing at Luke’s studio (Hard Luck Tattoo), we came up with the idea of combining our efforts.

Jack: When you formed was this sound the one you had in mind?

Phil: We were going for a more doomy/stoner approach when we first started jamming; and as any musician worth their weight knows, forcing things never works out well, so we tried what came naturally. Honesty is the best policy hands down. Play with heart and soul, everything else will follow.

Jack: There’s a clear Entombed influence to the band, are they the band that has had the most influence?

Phil: This always makes us chuckle a bit when people ask or say this, as none of would call ourselves massive fans of their music. We prefer harder cutting bands of a similar-ish sound, like Cursed, Tragedy, All Pigs Must Die etc. Less rock and roll more face punching depression.

Credit Lloyd Wright

Jack: What other bands have influenced Deadwound?

Phil: Apart from the above, the best way I can do it is name a band we’ve been listening to lately for each person in the band. Only seems fair- Mortichnia/Sleep/Meshuggah/Kvelertak/Blood Incantation.

Jack: Has being from London influenced the band?

Phil: Maybe in a way. Tricky question. I don’t think anyone is fully aware of what really influences them as most of what we take in goes into our subconscious. Musically maybe the claustrophobic atmosphere of London may add an edge. Also there’s so much going on all the time, if you’re passionate about something it’s hard not to get involved as there are so many more opportunities available to bands etc.

Jack: You’re about to release your debut Identity Shapes. What do you hope people take from it?

Phil: I think we hope more than anything that people can see that it’s written with heart, time and thought behind it. Obviously we want to keep moving forward getting better and progressing, but that people look back and see it as a good starting point. It is our first release so it’s early days and there’s lots more to come.

Jack: Is there a concept to Identity Shapes? What is behind the title of the album?

Phil: I’d say the lyrical content is fairly diverse, from personal experiences to storytelling. Also musically as well, whenever we write a song we try and keep the diversity up and not have anything too samey. So I think it’s a very accurate title. As anything in this world that is personal, or created in a personal framework, automatically it has an individuality and personal identity to it.

Jack: Given the harsh nature of your music, was the recording process a tough one?

Phil: Personally, no. I can’t speak for the others, although I’m sure they’d agree. This was an amazing experience and a very comfortable one for me. It only took us two days to get everything down. Over the years I’ve never really liked the recording process as I find it rigid and clinical. To me it’s not the correct atmosphere for music when its birth place is a live environment. Having said that, whenever I’ve recorded with Wayne Adams at Bear Bites Horse, he’s always done a 110% top job and I’d recommend any band to record with him. I’m very happy with the results for Identity Shapes.

Jack: What did working with Wayne Adams bring to the album?

Phil: Wayne makes it a very chilled and comfortable environment to record in. If something doesn’t click, he’ll spend the time rearranging/using different amps/offering advice to make something better and work right. His heart is really in it. He doesn’t just take your money and rush you out the door. He’s as passionate about it sounding killer as you are as a band. He’s recorded a lot of my friends’ bands that are of similar heaviness (Palehorse/Art of Burning Water/Yards) and I was so impressed with them. He has a knack for the low end. I think we’re all agreed we will be heading back there for our next session.

Jack: What is like working with Black Bow Records and how did you end up signing to Black Bow?

Phil: Really, really easy. Jon (Davis, also of Conan) has been so straight up and hardworking, considering he’s a very busy man. He’s put in for us based on one recording. For our first release, we’re very happy with how it’s all going.

Jack: Do you have a favourite song on the album?

Phil: For me, it’s ‘Babylon’ or ‘Cruel Road’ as they are more representative of our all-round-sound and where we’re heading. Babylon is always a crowd pleaser as well.

Jack: Given that you have members of Silent Front, Bast and Minoa in the band. Is it hard to find time for Deadwound?

Phil: Again, for me, no. I’ve been playing music in one form or another from the age of seven and Silent Front from the age of 13, it’s who I am and what makes me happiest. I have other projects on the go as well as these. It’s not really juggling as I see it, it’s keeping busy and working hard. Life is too short for bullshit and fucking around, do what makes you happy as often as you can. Everyone’s got a bus with a number on it, but no one knows what number their one is. It helps to remember that.

Jack: How did opening for Hang the Bastard’s final show go?

Phil: It was great and we were honoured to be asked to play as we’re such a new band. Great crowd too! We met Harrowed that night also who are killer and now playing our launch show.

Jack: What will you miss the most about Hang the Bastard?

Phil: I’d say it more comes down to the fact that it’s a shame another long standing and hardworking band have laid to rest. There aren’t many out there and, regardless of the style of music, that can have a positive impact on others who want to play music seriously without not caring about money/labels/scenes etc.

Jack: Are you doing anything special for your EP Launch show this month?

Phil: Just playing hard. And we hope that will be special enough.

Jack: What do you like about the supports?

Phil: We wanted a diverse bill for that night, to keep things interesting and furious. Each band brings that to the table and each band is amazing at what they do and definitely individual. You won’t be disappointed.

Jack: Finally what are your plans for the rest of the year?

Phil: Hopefully if all goes well and the cogs turn as they should, we want to record two tracks for a split (say no more) and start working on a full length record for the end of the year. In between all that we hope to play more and more shows and get out on the road.

More Deadwound:
Facebook
Bandcamp

Jack
About Jack (793 Articles)
I am a recent graduate from the University of Essex in Colchester where by the luck of Odin I met the editor, Dom. I first got into metal when I was 13 and now I am 22 and own an uncountable amount of band T-shirts. I also regularly attend gigs (local and in neighbouring areas) as well as festivals. My musical taste is varied; I like nu metal (my first love), thrash, black, death, doom, folk, sludge (my favourite genre), symphonic and many more of the multiple genres that metal has to offer, I even like some metalcore (I know it's a dirty word within some metal circles but some of it is outstanding). One of my most memorable metal moments was meeting Grand Magus at the Bloodstock signing tent and having the whole tent to myself, spending a few minutes talking to them.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*